Signs Your Child’s Feet May Be Hurting, Even if They Don’t Let On

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Children have an abundance of energy - they are constantly running, jumping, playing - and, unfortunately, they sometimes get hurt. And most times they don’t like to stop for pain or say anything about it. That can be a problem for parents, because they can’t fix a problem they aren’t aware of. Today, Dr. Joel Segalman and Dr. Stephen Lazaroff at Performance Foot & Ankle Specialists, LLC describe some signs that your child’s feet may be hurting, even if they don’t admit it. 

Paying close attention to your child’s foot health and their behavior can help you identify signs that something is not quite right with your little one’s feet. Children’s feet and lower legs can hurt for a number of reasons. Toenails can become ingrown, injuries occur while they’re playing, shoes can be too tight, etc.  

Children are very vocal at times about something that is hurting them. Other times, however, they don’t say a word. Still, certain symptoms and behavior can alert you to a child’s foot pain, so you can get them the help they need.  

Here are a few tips for recognizing foot problems in your child. 

  • Your child begins limping. An uneven gait may be an indication that putting weight on one foot is painful for them.

  • Your typically active child loses interest in their favorite sports or games. When an active child who loves running, sports or otherwise being active suddenly chooses not to participate, it may be a sign that those activities are causing them foot pain. This is a common symptom when dealing with Sever’s disease.

  • Your child doesn’t want to wear certain pairs of their shoes. If your child suddenly refuses to wear a specific pair of shoes, that footwear might be too small, causing them discomfort.

  • A child who normally prefers to walk on his or her own suddenly wants to be carried more frequently. Knowing what behaviors are and aren’t “normal” for your child is key, particularly if those behaviors cause them to favor one or both feet. 

If your child is acting differently and you’re concerned that they may be experiencing ankle or foot pain, Dr. Joel Segalman and Dr. Stephen Lazaroff at Performance Foot & Ankle Specialists, LLC can help you get to the root of the issue, and relieve the pain. Call our office today to schedule a consultation; you can reach our Waterbury office at (203) 755-0489 or our Newtown location at (203) 270-6724.